Us Shiprider Agreements

By , 19/12/2020

Bilateral law of the sea law enforcement agreements provide U.S. government ships and aviation platforms, as well as maritime law enforcement expertise, to assist the host country`s law enforcement agencies in exercising their authority. These agreements promote the sovereignty of the host nation by helping the host country enforce its laws and regulations. Shiprider`s agreements help fill global maritime policing gaps; Improved cooperation, coordination and interoperability; and strengthening maritime police capacity to more effectively combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (INN ACTIVITIES and other illicit activities). Fijian law enforcement, for example, can now work as “boaters” on U.S. Coast Guard and Navy vessels. Missions include the omission of suspicious vessels potentially involved in illegal activities such as illegal fishing and smuggling, including illicit drug trafficking. Over the past six years, U.S. Coast Guard and Navy vessels have helped host nations mount 103 ships and identify 33 violations, according to a 2018 U.S. Coast Guard report. The USCG Shiprider program remains an innovative and collaborative way to effectively influence the region. The USCG helps to strengthen regional stability whenever a new bilateral ship handling agreement is reached with a Pacific partner.

The U.S. Coast Guard routinely executes 16 bilateral fisheries agreements with countries in the Eastern Pacific and West Africa. These agreements allow U.S. government ships and U.S. Coast Guard law enforcement to help the host country`s law enforcement agencies better exercise their authority. Shiprider`s agreements help fill global maritime policing gaps; Improved cooperation, coordination and interoperability; and strengthening maritime police capacity to more effectively combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (INN ACTIVITIES and other illicit activities). The adoption of ship agreements between other countries and in other regions could help strengthen maritime enforcement efforts around the world. “The implementation of these bilateral driver agreements allows us both to protect our own [exclusive economic zones] and to help and develop capabilities and capabilities with the countries with which we have agreements,” said Richard Howes of the U.S. Coast Guard, who oversaw enforcement operations in the Pacific in 2016. , in an interview with Sea Power magazine.

Securing sea routes for international trade has always been important to the United States in securing peaceful links in the global supply chain. The Pacific Island region spans much of the Indo-Pacific area and its nations enjoy the shared importance of the economic value of their coastal seas. This economy remains dynamic, as some countries are rich in natural resources and successfully manage these assets, and others are not able to succeed on their own. The security problems facing these nations are also different. In this very active region, growing powers such as China and India openly discuss trade and security objectives, recognizing that the latter is necessary to ensure the former. The way nations deal with these commitments in the region is also different. Some are in favour of agreements based on control of resources and territories, while others are content with access and future partnership. The Shiprider Agreements are an innovative and collaborative way to make the ocean more efficient for the police.

The adoption of ship agreements between other countries and in other regions could contribute to intensifying global efforts to crack down on maritime traffic. Countries wishing to learn more about shipping agreements can contact U.S. Coast Guard via the contact point or the United States.

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